Scientists Just Discovered A New Organ In The Human Body

When John Mayer sang ‘Your Body Is A Wonderland’, he meant it in a truly non-scientific way. Scientists have proven that those lyrics ring true however, for the human body is indeed as mysterious as any wonderland Mayer could have been referencing. Just when we thought we knew everything there was to know about them, it turns out our bodies have secretly been housing another organ within the digestive system.

Called the ‘mesentery’, this 79th organ of our body was actually discovered several years ago, but dismissed as a fragmented form, rather than a full bodied organ. Dr. J. Calvin Coffey, the man who proved it otherwise, said in his release, “The anatomic description that had been laid down over 100 years of anatomy was incorrect. This organ is far from fragmented and complex. It is simply one continuous structure.”

A digital representation of the small and large intestines and associated mesentery by J Calvin Coffey, D Peter O’Leary, Henry Vandyke Carter.  Source: The Independent

A digital representation of the small and large intestines and associated mesentery by J Calvin Coffey, D Peter O’Leary, Henry Vandyke Carter.
Source: The Independent

The mesentery is a double fold of the peritoneum which is the lining of the abdominal cavity that connects the intestine to the wall of the abdomen. It holds together the pancreas, spleen, small intestine, stomach, and other organs, against the posterior abdominal wall. The discovery doesn’t change the anatomical structure of our bodies, but it does mean there will be improved health outcomes, due to the role this organ may play in abdominal diseases. The exact function of this organ is yet to be established, following which, abnormal functioning will be noted down, to aid in the event of disease.

The discovery is so great, that even Gray’s Anatomy, the gospel of the medical world, has decided to update their medical textbook.

Representational feature image courtesy of Yahoo! News

Words: Cara Shrivastava

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